Questions to Ask Your Gynaecologist

11 May

Do you always feel shy about discussing certain things with your gynaecologist? Whether it’s an embarrassing question, confession or concern, it’s important to voice out everything that’s happening within your body to your specialist. The following are some of the questions that you shouldn’t feel anxious to ask to your gynae.

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1. “Why does having sex hurt oftentimes?”

While not all women experience pain during sex, it still affects 15 percent of women in Singapore at some point in their life. Typically, women think that experiencing pain during sex is just normal, and is something that they should just bear – when in fact, they shouldn’t do so. Genital pain is treatable. So if you ever experience pain during sex, do inform your doctor about it. That way, your doctor will be able to create a treatment plan that’s right for you, or connect you to resources or groups that specialize in genital pain.

2. “Why does my vagina itch?”

Although talking about vaginal itching is quite embarrassing, it’s crucial that you inform your gynaecologist every time you experience this. Most women immediately assume that they have yeast infection, and undergo medications when they really don’t have to. Truth is, vaginal itching can be a sign of vulvar skin disorder, STI, bacterial infection, or, in rare cases, vulvar cancer. So if you’re experiencing itching, do discuss it with your doctor. Any problem related with your lady parts should be brought to your specialist’s attention.

3. “Is vaginal odour a sign of STD or any infection?”

Issues about vaginal odour are quite common, so don’t ever feel like you’re the only one who worries about it. Oftentimes, a vaginal odour is normal and your gynae will reassure you of it so you’ll feel more confident and comfortable with your body, especially your lady parts. If you’re sure that something is wrong, however, then do let your doctor know. Your vaginal odour problem may reflect an infection or a bacterial imbalance that is treatable.

4. “Why do I leak urine sometimes?”

Urinary incontinence is experienced by women from all ages, but is mostly common among pre-menopausal and post-menopausal women, particularly to those with children. While the issue can be socially isolating and embarrassing, women shouldn’t suffer in silence with this condition since it’s something that can actually be treated when they choose to see a gynae in Singapore for their vaginal health. In fact, there are several ways on how you can treat its symptoms, from taking medications, weight loss, implant devices, bladder training, and even surgery. Simply talk about your condition with your doctor on your next gynaecology visit to see what treatment would best suit you.

5. “Should I get screened for STD if I caught my partner cheating?”

Regardless if you’re worried about the consequences of your partner’s unfaithfulness, bringing this topic up on your gynaecology visit can be really embarrassing. Still, your specialist should be the person you should talk to regarding this issue. Ask your gynae about undergoing a comprehensive STD test. Doing this won’t only ease your mind, it might also save your life. Always remember that if you have just the slightest concern about your sexual health, consider having it checked out.

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6. “Why am I experiencing hot flashes? Is it a symptom of menopause, or something more serious?”

Most women don’t talk about the hot flashes they are experiencing because they think it’s normal, and just a natural symptom of menopause and aging. But that shouldn’t be the case. Experts actually advise pre-menopausal women to discuss their concern about hot flashes with their doctor. While it’s true that it’s a sign of menopause, hot flashes can actually be indicator of a more serious health condition like thyroid imbalance. Such symptoms can be easily related with pre- and post-menopausal but never assume that they are. So the next time you experience hot flashes, do inform your gynaecologist.

7. “Does the change in colour and texture in my vagina’s skin indicate a more serious problem?”

Being aware of the changes occurring in your genital area is crucial, as is sharing those changes with your specialist, especially if you notice changes in skin texture and colour. Such changes can be an early warning sign of a benign vulvar skin disorder known as lichen sclerosus. If left untreated, this condition can cause the thinning of the vulvar skin, resulting to severe itching, tearing of the genital skin during intercourse or painful sex. Fortunately, this condition can be treated when detected early on.

8. “Why do I experience painful menstrual periods?”

Experiencing severe discomfort and pain during your menstrual cycles can be a sign of a lot of things, including a serious, but treatable, condition knowns as endometriosis. According to data, millions of women can be affected by endometriosis but a lot of cases still go undiagnosed. The reason? Most women fail to share the symptoms with their specialist during their hospital visits. With that said, experts remind all women that menstrual pain shouldn’t be considered as a normal part of their monthly period. Just like some health conditions, endometriosis can treated and cured, if it’s only addressed early on.

9. “How do I perform a self-examination on my breasts?”

If you’re among the women who are confused as to what they should be doing to detect and prevent breast cancer, then welcome to the club! How to perform self-breast examination is actually one of the questions that you should ask your doctor and demand a clear answer. By learning how to self-examine your breasts for some lumps, you’ll be able to increase your chances of detecting and preventing breast cancer early on.

Be it a rather embarrassing question or concern about entering the maternity stage, always remember that informing your gynae about everything that’s happening on your body is crucial. So start developing a two-communication with your specialist now, by asking some of the aforementioned questions on your next gynae visit.

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